Jamaica

WATCH THIS: Who Pulled A Knife On Fantan Mojah?

WATCH THIS: Who Pulled A Knife On Fantan Mojah?

Violent Threat Causes Lion To Roar

Recently, a controversial video surfaced where Fantan Mojah accuses an un-named artist of pulling a knife on him. Fanton Mojah sees the violation as a major disrespect because it is someone that he respects and had a friendship with. Fantan Mojah  demands a public apology from said artist, causing many to speculate about who the artist is referring to as “The Kid” and “God”.  Fantan Mojah never mentions what precipitated the argument, just states “Why you get offended over truth?” More After The Jump…

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WATCH THIS: Jah9 “Prosper” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Jah9 "Prosper" Official Music Video

“Be Confident In All We Do And Say”

Jah9 has just released the video for “Prosper,” the fourth video from her latest album “9.” The video directed by Samo Kush-I, was shot in black and white complete with a vintage 35mm camera feel, as Jah9 sings encouraging lyrics of spirituality and empowerment in a relaxed and calming voice. “Whatever is worth doing is worth doing to the highest level,” says Jah9. “And the time we spend in service to high upful endeavors serves to build. The chorus of the song is an affirmation, a mantra, a spell that can be used daily to empower. The outside world will seem less intimidating when we feel more empowered and less insecure about our value.” Video After The Jump…

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WATCH THIS: Charly Black “F**K Sweet/Whinning Vixen” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Charly Black "F**K Sweet/Whinning Vixen" Official Music Video

Charly Black Releases New Video Before His Party Animal U.S.A. Tour 

Before the west coast stops on his U.S.A. tour to Seattle, L.A. and Oakland, Charly Black released the visual for “F**K Sweet” and “Whinning Vixen” production collaborations with NotNice Records and DJ Tropical Production, respectively. More After The Jump…

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HEAR THIS: Jahmiel “Strongest Soldier”

HEAR THIS: Jahmiel "Strongest Soldier"

Why Do The Realest People Live The Hardest Life?
“Man get whole heap ah love whole heap ah hate,” sings Jahmiel on this standout track from Chimney Records’ warm and easy “Money House Riddim,” distributed by the mighty 21st Hapilos. The young singer became Boomshots’ pick for Breakthrough Artist of 2016 by putting in work to deliver the sustenace of inspiration via indelible melodies. But even as he elevates his game, a Great Man must sometimes remind myself that the Lord will never give him more than he can bear. Audio After The Jump… Read more »

WATCH THIS: Samory I “Rasta Nuh Gangsta” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Samory I "Rasta Nuh Gangsta" Official Music Video

A Man With Locks Don’t Need No Glocks

Not every music artist can “buss” right out the gate, sometimes it takes cultivation before they are rewarded with the fruits of their labor. After four years of slowly building a following, Samory I is primed to be a major voice in reggae music in 2017 with the release of “Rasta Nuh Gangsta,” which addresses some common misconceptions about Rastafarians. Video And Interview After The Jump… Read more »

HEAR THIS: Chronixx “Likes”

HEAR THIS: Chronixx "Likes"

The First Single From Chronology Arrives

“Ah no everybody ah go like we,” sings Chronixx, “still we irie.” Over a pulsating electronic rhythm, produced by the artist himself, Chronixx defies “reggae revival” expectations as he reflects on what really matters to him, and to music lovers the world over. On the surface this is a song about artistic substance over social media hype, but a careful listen reveals a pointed critique of the state of Jamaican music at a moment when the world is rocking to reggae rhythms. “Nuff a them still stuck inna the quicksand,” he sings. “A Gentleman me hear ah play a Finland.” Point being that artists who are satisified with “running di place” in Jamaica may be missing the bigger picture. “We never buck them up pon no flight,” Chronixx observes. “We never see them pon tour life.” Speaking of which, the Chronology North America tour, supported by Jah9Jesse Royal, and Kelissa, kicks off March 2nd and runs through April 30th. Who no like it vex.  Audio After The Jump… Read more »

WATCH THIS: John Brown’s Body ft. Karim Israel “Hard Man Fe Dead” Official Music Video PREMIERE

WATCH THIS: John Brown's Body ft. Karim Israel "Hard Man Fe Dead" Official Music Video PREMIERE

JBB Inna Prince Buster Stylee

After 20-odd years mashing up stages all over the planet, John Brown’s Body is releasing their first official music video. Boomshots is proud to premiere the clip for “Hard Man Fe Dead,”a track off the band’s Fireflies album on Easy Star Records, featuring some tasty toasting courtesy of Karim Israel of Arise Roots. “‘Hard Man Fe Dead’ is a tribute to the late Prince Buster,” says lead singer Elliot Martin, “dedicated to the extended family of musicians that we are a part of. How good and pleasant it is to play some hard Reggae music with all these talented people!” In case this clip gets you in a similar mood, take note of the band’s tour dates below. This music caan dead. Video After The Jump…
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HEAR THIS: Micah Shemaiah x Giark “Rude Bwoy Jamaica”

HEAR THIS: Micah Shemaiah x Giark "Rude Bwoy Jamaica"

Rough and Tough, Vibes Nuff Nuff

“This song in no way shape or form promotes gangsterism,” states Micah Shemaiah on his Soundcloud page. Over a raw rub-a-dub riddim season seasoned with live horns and percussion, Shemaiah and Craig “Giark” Dixon (son of legendary producer Bobby Digital, and an accomplished producer in his own right) address the realities of life in “a rude boy town.” By way of clarification, the singer points out that the song is “about positive change” despite its title. “The term goes from our foundation in the Ghettos of Jamaica where ones had to grow up very rough. It’s not about wrong doings its about being tough and not standing for what the system has to offer us. Original rude bwoys of Jamaica were not always violent gun-toting gangsters but breddrens and even sistrens who were not part of the status quo, who did not subscribe to certain things the “society” called norms.” The song says it all. Audio After The Jump…
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HEAR THIS: Protoje “Blood Money”

HEAR THIS: Protoje "Blood Money"

Real Talk Without Any Apology

From “Kingston Be Wise” to “Sudden Flight,” Protoje has made a habit of speaking unspoken truths without apology. His latest release “Blood Money” takes that fearless outspoken-ness to new heights. “Police cancel operation, cause no real badman go a station,” states (who changed his Twitter handle to BLXXDCLXT), dropping lyrical truth bombs over Winta James’ stark rub-a-dub riddim, which has been bubbling on Jamaican radio for the past several weeks. “Blood money run the nation,” he chants on the chorus. “This song is so socially relevant, people connect to it on first listen,” he told the FADER who premiered the video.” It’s speaking about things that are collectively on all of our minds, that we all want to talk about, and I’m using my voice to bring these topics to the forefront of conversation… With all that is happening in Jamaica, criticism is often one-sided and directed to the have-nots—the people who have less are made to seem like the problem in society. This is unfair, hypocritical, and widely inaccurate. This song seeks to bring about certain conversations, to talk about what is really happening in our society.” Check the red-hot visuals courtesy of Taj Francis. Video After The Jump… Read more »

HEAR THIS: Nesbeth “New Gangster”

HEAR THIS: Nesbeth "New Gangster"

Redefining The Concept

A versatile artist with a strong singing voice, Nesbeth took his career to new heights last year with his inspirational tune called “My Dream.” His latest release, on DJ Frass’ percolating “Street Light” Riddim, seeks to redefine the concept of “gangster” for a new generation. “Gone is the days when we used to glorify py py,” he sings to kick things off. “Every youth wise up now this a civilized time.” Envisioning economic upliftment without firing shots, Nesbeth sketches out a vision of what could be possible if people made up their mind to bring about change: “Buy mama house ah de new gangsta, take care of your youth ah de new gangster.” With a cover image showing a trash can filled to the brim with discarded firearms, the new single is powerful enough to stir up hope in the hardest of hearts. “Life too sweet fi deh inna prison lock,” Nebeth sings. “Look on your favorite hero, who no lockup play zero.” Some have interpreted his lyrics as a swipe at incarcerated “Dancehall Hero” Vybz Kartel, but his message of aspiring to be “rich and up” sounds more positive than provocative. With Jamaican experiencing elevated crime rates at the start of the new year, this tune is right on time. Audio After The Jump… Read more »

HEAR THIS: Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley “Roar Fi A Cause” PREMIERE

HEAR THIS: Damian "Jr. Gong" Marley "Roar Fi A Cause" PREMIERE

When The Lion Roars, The Whole Jungle Trembles

Gongzilla claps a lyrical gun salute in this hardcore reality tune about the rules & laws & codes of conduct that govern life pon di ends—and the lionheart street soldiers who enforce them. “All who perpetrate hafi pack up and run,” Damian spits with an ill rapid-fire flow on this high energy dancehall track produced by Sean “Pow” Diedrick and featuring what sounds like a Buju sample on the chorus. Like the song says, “No shot nah buss when a man a keep treat.” One more wicked piece of tune from the Stony Hill files. Wickedness increase! Audio After The Jump… Read more »

WATCH THIS: Kassiano “Room In My Father’s House” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Kassiano "Room In My Father's House" Official Music Video

While Trump Spreads Fear And Division, Reggae Music Offers A Different Message

The whole world is feeling shaky today as the U.S.A.’s 45th President takes the oath of office amidst protests as cries of “Not my President” clash with “America first.” The impulse to resist what’s happening is strong, but what’s the best way? The Jamaican-born Mexico-based reggae singer Kassiano has a unique perspective on things—since he is both black and lives in the first country that candidate Trump vilified in his campaign of hate and fear. “There is room in my father’s house for everyone,” Kassiano sings in this roots reggae anthem recorded in Jamaican in 2014 at Mikey Bennett’s studio featuring the talents of Dean Fraser on saxophone. The song’s lyrics envision a world of abundance as God intended rather than the zero sum game posited by fearmongering politicians. “We are spiritual beings having a human experience,” says Kassiano, who is also a noted spiritual healer. “Be still and connect to the source of God within you.” Spreading unity and resisting the urge to fight—what a concept! Kassiano’s message is right on time. Turn this up loud. Audio After The Jump…
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