Posts tagged "Sanchez"

Interview With Wayne Marshall Regarding His New Song, “Glory To God,” featuring Tessanne Chin and Ryan Mark

Interview With Wayne Marshall Regarding His New Song, "Glory To God," featuring Tessanne Chin and Ryan Mark

Wayne Marshall Creates A Worship Song That Mirrors His Spirituality

Widespread fans are connecting with the lyrics of a gospel infused dancehall track, entitled, “Glory to God” by Wayne Marshall featuring Songtress and Winner of The Voice, Season 5 Tessanne Chin and  Gospel Singer and Reverend of Pure Heart Ministries, Ryan Mark. We spoke to Wayne about the inspiration behind this influential song.  Interview After The Jump…

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FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Sanchez “Wherever I Lay My Hat”

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Sanchez "Wherever I Lay My Hat"

Sanchez Music Stands The Test of Time; Classy Like The Vintage Fedora

These days Kevin Anthony Jackson, Sanchez, lays his hat in the home he made with his wife Monica Jackson at Sanmonik Productions.  However the 22 year old song, “Wherever I Lay My Hat,” remains a fan favorite. Producer,  Robert “Bobby Digital”  Dixon created the “Heavy Rock” riddim with this signature voice in reggae music in 1995. Listening to Sanchez belt out the lyrics from the song’s first note, one knows immediately that this voice was predestined by God to bring beautiful lyrics to the masses. This Friday we flashback on the poignant lyrics of this song.  More After The Jump…

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HEAR THIS: Busy Signal “Colder”

HEAR THIS: Busy Signal "Colder"

The Turf Prez Touches Up A Classic King Jammy’s Riddim

Some things just can’t be improved upon, but that doesn’t mean they should be left alone. King Jammy’s 1987 “Score” Riddim is a perfect example, a track that defines digital lovers rock. There was something about Steely’s warm and easy computer bassline and those crstyal-clear twinkling high notes combined with Clevie’s tastefully understated drum programming. The riddim became an instant classic when it first appeared on Frankie Paul’s “I Know The Score” from FP’s crucial Original Sara album, with additional  versions by Sanchez and Thriller U available on 12-inch discomix. A quarter century later Busy Signal has brought the riddim forward with a brand new song entitled “Colder.” Utilizing Edi Fitzroy’s distinctive stammer-phrase on the hook, the Turf Prez sings for the girls,  evokes bygone dancehall days, and pays homage to the elders who paved the way. The only thing worth changing is the title, cause this tune is definitely #Hotted. “Fe real, fe real, fe real pull up that one from top.” Audio After The Jump… Read more »

The Love Chocolate Playlist

The Love Chocolate Playlist

Boomshots Presents A Multi-Genre Playlist for Valentine’s 2016

It’s that time again, lovers. This article features 14 decadent tunes in Reggae, Jazz, Contemporary, and Rhythm and Blues, for your listening pleasure. The songs were selected based on the artist/talent, lyrical content and overall sound. More After The Jump Read more »

Free Up The Herbs: 40 of Reggae’s Highest-Grade Ganja Anthems

Free Up The Herbs: 40 of Reggae's Highest-Grade Ganja Anthems

Marijuana Laws May Be Changing, But These Rebel Music Selections Will Keep Playing Forever

Every day brings new headlines about voters in the U.S.A. passing medical marijuana laws and American states decriminalizing reefer—even as the Federal government reserves the right to swoop in and prosecute whoever however whenever. Meanwhile venture capitalists continue to align themselves with the Bob Marley estate in order to build a global ganja brand. It feels like a bright new day in the long-running batttle to legalize Jamaica’s national herb. But don’t sleep: the Governor General has yet to sign the proposal that would allow Rastas to cultivate for personal use and corporations to cultivate for profit. And Jamaica’s Governor General still answers to the Queen of England, so there’s no telling what will happen. Meanwhile youths all over the world are still getting locked up for illegal possession of the wisdom weed. So the binghi drums have to beat and songs like these have to play, words sounds and power. These are not just “weed tunes” but songs about the real-life struggles surrounding ganja prohibition. say are they just one-line shout-outs, like the tune where Bounty and Cham said “tell the government free up the weed policy,” as wicked as that was. These are the rabble-rousing songs dedicated to defending marijuana growers and sellers and smokers from all forms of downpression. Some relate to the nitty-gritty details of the hustler’s life, others focus on police efforts to fight against the weed, while others make the case for legalization. Any topic that could inspire so much great music has to be important. Just like Josey Wales said on track #20, “It Haffi Bun.” And these songs have to play. Audio After The Jump; Countdown Continues Above Read more »

WATCH THIS: Shabba Ranks Rules On Da Reggae Tip 2014

WATCH THIS: Shabba Ranks Rules On Da Reggae Tip 2014

Beenie, Shaggy, Sanchez, and Spice Help the Hot 97 Crew Kick off Labor Day Weekend 2014

This past Friday, just like every other Friday before a Labor Day Weekend in recent memory, a galaxy of reggae and dancehall stars descended on Hot 97’s annual showcase On Da Reggae Tip. Just as in years past, the event was hosted by Bobby Konders and Jabba, whose Sunday-night reggae show has been a fixture on New York’s No. 1 hip-hop station since 1992. And as like in year’s past, there were a few surprise guests from the worlds of R&B, hip-hop, and classic dancehall waiting in the wings. But some things this year were very different, starting with the venue. Instead of the ornate but overcrowded Hammerstein Ballroom, where the perennially sold-out show has always been held, ODRT2014 took place at a much larger outdoor venue, JBL Live at Pier 97 on the edge of Manhattan’s Hudson River. As the sun set on a perfect late-summer evening, the show kicked off with blossoming pop stars like teenage sensation Samantha J, and Tessanne Chin, the Jamaican-born crooner who won the last season of NBC’s The Voice, as well as dancehall acts like Tifa, currently riding high off her single “Bak It Up” and Kranium, the Brooklyn-based DJ whose keep-it-on-the-downlow single “Nobody Has To Know” has made him a name to know. < Full Review And Videos After the Jump… Read more »

HEAR THIS: Shaggy ft. Sanchez “With You”

HEAR THIS: Shaggy ft. Sanchez "With You"

Two Dancehall Giants Link To Make A Modern Classic

Maintaining the vibes of his brilliant Sly & Robbie collaboration album Out of Many One Music Shaggy continues to build with some of the greatest talents of the reggae and dancehall genre. On this brand new release he joins forces with the elusive singer Sanchez D to create a next modern classic. “Now you’re tuned to the immortal sound,” Shagsman says and Sanchez chimes in about being “Better when we are together.” Ladies this is yours. Audio After The Jump…
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Air Supply’s Lord Graham Russell On The Group’s Jamaican Fanbase: “It Really Took Us By Surprise.”

Air Supply's Lord Graham Russell On The Group's Jamaican Fanbase: "It Really Took Us By Surprise."

Why Are These Two ’80s Pop Stars Headlining One of New York’s Biggest Reggae Festivals This Sunday?

This Sunday June 29th, Roy Wilkins Park will feel more like Jamaica West Indies than Jamaica Queens. On that day thousands of reggae fans will converge for Groovin’ In The Park, New York’s most upscale summer music festival, which boasts a lineup that includes Beres Hammond, Marcia Griffiths, Chronixx, John Holt, Bob Andy, Judy Mowatt, and L.U.S.T.—all performing their own special brand of classical roots reggae with perhaps a sprinkling of soul (Beres Hammond) or a dash of dancehall (Chronixx). All except one, the Australian-born soft-rock duo Air Supply. Yes, you read that right. The over-the-top pop act who sprinkled the 1980s with gems like “Lost In Love” and “Every Woman in the World” will be performing alongside a full slate of reggae royalty. Shocked? Surprised? To tell the truth, so are they. Interview After The Jump… Read more »

Konshens Pays Respect To 47 Reggae Superstars Who Paved the Way

Konshens Pays Respect To 47 Reggae Superstars Who Paved the Way

Who And Who Rates As An Icon Inna The Business?

Remember when Shabba Ranks dropped that tune “Respect“? “Step by step you haffi climb the ladder / The elders you haffi show respect fah.” It’s plan to see that Konshens got the message. He may be on top of the game now, but he’s not one of those “likkle entertainers” who lose sight of the fact that their opportunities came from icons before him. The Dancehall artist recent single, “Icon,” on the Bad Bounce riddim, pays tribute to a long list of certified icons, all of whom helped “put the spotlight on we island” and established the worldwide success of Jamaican music.Audio & Photo Gallery After The Jump… Read more »

The Xterminator Top 10

10 Reasons Why The Late Great Fattis Burrell’s Music Can’t Stop Play

This weekend brought word of another reggae legend’s passing. Phillip “Fattis” Burrell, the man behind the crucial dancehall and reggae label Xterminator Records—and before that, Vena Records—died on Saturday after suffering a heart attack two weeks ago. The prolific producer who helped launch the careers of Luciano, Sizzla, Sanchez and Pinchers will be keenly missed.

Everybody has their Fattis favorites; he recorded decades’ worth of great music with just about every significant singer and DJ in Jamaica. And we’re not even going to try and touch on the classics he produced for Vena. But when the roll is called up yonder, these tunes have got to be there. Run that… Read more »

Unforgettable: Reasoning With Sanchez, Part 2

From The Church To The Dancehall, Sanchez D Hits All The Right Notes

The Conclusion of Our Xclusive Interview… Continued From Part 1

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Unforgettable: Reasoning With Sanchez, Part 1

From The Church To The Dancehall, Sanchez D Hits All The Right Notes.

Sanchez is one of those year-to-year singers who’s too often forgotten. So consistently stellar are his crystalline vocals, so unwavering is his standard of excellence, that we sometimes take him for granted. In such cases the best thing to do is walk away for a few years and make them miss you. After all, the man has been singing his heart out since the late ’80s, investing improbable pop songs with so much drama and passion that you forget all about the originals. Then he drops an album like the all-original 1995 masterpiece Praise Him, and the reggae world goes into a frenzy. But apart from being sampled all over the “Dipset Anthem,” mainstream success has eluded this supremely gifted vocalist. Not that he’s hurting in the least. 

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