Posts tagged "Bobby Digital"

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Sanchez “Wherever I Lay My Hat”

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Sanchez "Wherever I Lay My Hat"

Sanchez Music Stands The Test of Time; Classy Like The Vintage Fedora

These days Kevin Anthony Jackson, Sanchez, lays his hat in the home he made with his wife Monica Jackson at Sanmonik Productions.  However the 22 year old song, “Wherever I Lay My Hat,” remains a fan favorite. Producer,  Robert “Bobby Digital”  Dixon created the “Heavy Rock” riddim with this signature voice in reggae music in 1995. Listening to Sanchez belt out the lyrics from the song’s first note, one knows immediately that this voice was predestined by God to bring beautiful lyrics to the masses. This Friday we flashback on the poignant lyrics of this song.  More After The Jump…

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Seanizzle Realizes His Higher Purpose In Music

Seanizzle Realizes His Higher Purpose In Music

A Life Threatening Accident Causes Seanizzle to Produce Music With A Message

In the fall of 2016, Sean Reid, Seanizzle was basking in the glory of the “47 Floor” riddim, with it’s bosterous trumpet propagating over waves of jazz sounds.  Two months later, on November 27, 2016,  the producer experienced moments that changed his life forever. As Seanizzle recovered at Kingston Public Hospital, he felt thankful to be alive and had a greater appreciation for making music. We spoke with Seanizzle about his musical path and spiritual enlightenment. More After The Jump…

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HEAR THIS: Micah Shemaiah x Giark “Rude Bwoy Jamaica”

HEAR THIS: Micah Shemaiah x Giark "Rude Bwoy Jamaica"

Rough and Tough, Vibes Nuff Nuff

“This song in no way shape or form promotes gangsterism,” states Micah Shemaiah on his Soundcloud page. Over a raw rub-a-dub riddim season seasoned with live horns and percussion, Shemaiah and Craig “Giark” Dixon (son of legendary producer Bobby Digital, and an accomplished producer in his own right) address the realities of life in “a rude boy town.” By way of clarification, the singer points out that the song is “about positive change” despite its title. “The term goes from our foundation in the Ghettos of Jamaica where ones had to grow up very rough. It’s not about wrong doings its about being tough and not standing for what the system has to offer us. Original rude bwoys of Jamaica were not always violent gun-toting gangsters but breddrens and even sistrens who were not part of the status quo, who did not subscribe to certain things the “society” called norms.” The song says it all. Audio After The Jump…
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WATCH THIS: Anthony Cruz “Where Would I Be” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Anthony Cruz "Where Would I Be" Official Music Video

Giving Thanks For Guidance and Protection

Anthony Cruz is one of those under-the-radar reggae singers whose understated excellence deserves more praise than it receives. We first noticed him when he was rolling with the 5th Element crew alongside Richie Spice and Chuck Fender (aka “The Poor People Defender). Although he can finesse a lover’s rock tune more sweetly than most, Cruz has always been at his best singing reality tunes. “Place Too Bloody” his combination with Buju Banton, and the Beres Hammond produced “Dem Block Di Road” on Harmony House’s “Feel Good” riddim are two outstanding examples. Yesterday Cruz released a new video on his official website revealing that his clean-cut look has been replaced with a ragga-ragga Rastafari image. In the song, produced by the legendary Bobby Digital, Cruz gives thanks for live, health, and strength—acknowledging that even when he feels he’s in “Cruz control” there is a higher power calling the shots. Dropping so soon after Jamaica’s close call with Hurricane Matthew, the message is as timely as the song is strong.  Audio After The Jump… Read more »

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Phillip Fraser “God of My Righteousness”

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Phillip Fraser "God of My Righteousness"

Reggae Music Legend in the Mecca of Music and Culture, Brooklyn

The sun was shinning bright as I walked along New York Avenue, in Brooklyn, New York. I was greeted by a Rastafarian King, left hand over the heart,  wearing a sunny yellow hat with a  polo to match. I tipped my black shades to take a closer look at the face of the person greeting me and it was the living legend himself, Phillip Fraser!  He was shocked that I recognized who he was. I said “Great music is great music!” Known for albums  like “Come Ethiopians” (1974, Freedom Sound Label), “Back to Africa” (1978, Different Records, original recording with Busta Riley, Winston Riley’s brother) featuring Earth and Stone, “Blood of the Saint” (1983), “Never Let Go” (1991, Razor Sound Records), “Phillip Fraser: Sharp Like Razor” (1993, Razor Sound Records),  “More Phillip Fraser” (2015, Razor Sound Records) and a plethora of complication albums and productions. If you appreciate roots reggae and lovers rock, you have to know this artists’ anthology of music. Interview After The Jump… Read more »