Rastafari

WATCH THIS: Who Pulled A Knife On Fantan Mojah?

WATCH THIS: Who Pulled A Knife On Fantan Mojah?

Violent Threat Causes Lion To Roar

Recently, a controversial video surfaced where Fantan Mojah accuses an un-named artist of pulling a knife on him. Fanton Mojah sees the violation as a major disrespect because it is someone that he respects and had a friendship with. Fantan Mojah  demands a public apology from said artist, causing many to speculate about who the artist is referring to as “The Kid” and “God”.  Fantan Mojah never mentions what precipitated the argument, just states “Why you get offended over truth?” More After The Jump…

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WATCH THIS: Jah9 “Prosper” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Jah9 "Prosper" Official Music Video

“Be Confident In All We Do And Say”

Jah9 has just released the video for “Prosper,” the fourth video from her latest album “9.” The video directed by Samo Kush-I, was shot in black and white complete with a vintage 35mm camera feel, as Jah9 sings encouraging lyrics of spirituality and empowerment in a relaxed and calming voice. “Whatever is worth doing is worth doing to the highest level,” says Jah9. “And the time we spend in service to high upful endeavors serves to build. The chorus of the song is an affirmation, a mantra, a spell that can be used daily to empower. The outside world will seem less intimidating when we feel more empowered and less insecure about our value.” Video After The Jump…

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Reasoning with Jah Bami: “I Focus So Much on Musical Integrity”

Reasoning with Jah Bami: "I Focus So Much on Musical Integrity"

Multi-talented Musician & Burgeoning Business Mogul Builds His Brand

Jah Bami, born Marvin Walters in Trinidad and Tobago, learned to play instruments at a young age-including the guitar, piano, drums and steel pan. His mastery of instruments earned him a musical scholarship  to the University of the West Indies, which provided him a plethora of opportunities to take his career to the next level. Now he tours the world solo and as part of his deejay group, Suns of Dub. Furthermore, Jah Bami owns a record label, clothing line and brand of smoke wrapping papers. We spoke to Jah Bami about his many hats in the entertainment business. Interview After The Jump… Read more »

WATCH THIS: Samory I “Rasta Nuh Gangsta” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Samory I "Rasta Nuh Gangsta" Official Music Video

A Man With Locks Don’t Need No Glocks

Not every music artist can “buss” right out the gate, sometimes it takes cultivation before they are rewarded with the fruits of their labor. After four years of slowly building a following, Samory I is primed to be a major voice in reggae music in 2017 with the release of “Rasta Nuh Gangsta,” which addresses some common misconceptions about Rastafarians. Video And Interview After The Jump… Read more »

WATCH THIS: Jah9 “Unafraid” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Jah9 "Unafraid" Official Music Video

Lioness Order Lays Down The Law

A lot of times when an artist starts to grow in popularity they tend to avoid rocking the boat and shun material that some may find controversial. That isn’t the case with Jah9 who has just released a video for the song “Unafraid,” which deals with the taboo subject of child molestation. When she sings “Nasty likkle teacher bwoy touching on my nephew, stirring up the dragon in my head,” the outrage is understandable. But lines like “Willing to stick a head ‘pon a fence” will definitely make some people uncomfortable. Boomshots reached out to the artist for some insight. “We’re not promoting violence,” she explained, “but we’re not promoting complacency about such a serious thing.” Video and Interview After The Jump… Read more »

WATCH THIS: Hempress Sativa “Fight For Your Rights” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Hempress Sativa "Fight For Your Rights" Official Music Video

A Luta Continua

When it comes to female reggae artists on the rise, Jah9 usually gets the lion’s share of the discussion. But she is not alone. Hempress Sativa is rapidly gaining the attention she deserves as a brilliant artist who can sing, dj, and even rap. First introduced to music by her father Albert ‘Ilawi Malawi’ Johnson, selector for the legendary Jah Love Sound System, Kerida Johnson began performing at the age of 13. She chose the name Hempress Sativa which she said represents “a state of euphoria, a state of consciousness, [and] a state of high.” Her music is rooted in her Rastafarian faith and includes songs such as the marijuana anthem “Oo La La La: The Weed Thing,” the sensuous “Kushite Love,” and the homage to sound system culture “Boom (Wa Da Da Deng),” alongside Paolo Baldini DubFiles. Today we focus on the  Hempress’ latest single “Fight For Your Rights,” produced by Conquering Lion Records, mixed by The Original Dub Master “Scientist,” and released to coincide with the 86th coronation of H.I.M. Haile Selassie I and Empress Menen. Of the song’s new video Hempress Sativa wrote on her Facebook page “People of African descent were considered underlings and were being denied then and still now some basic human rights! So With the 1930 Coronation, The Royal Family of H.I.M Haile Selassie I and Empress Menen exemplified nobility and a dynasty as long as King Solomon and Queen of Sheba reconciling the fact that we (Black People) were from the beginning indeed the first civilization and not savages as their stories would have us believe.” Video After The Jump… Read more »

WATCH THIS: Lutan Fyah “Sweet Trichomes” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Lutan Fyah "Sweet Trichomes" Official Music Video

Brand New Visuals Fi Di Ganja Man Dem

Born in Spanish Town, Jamaica Lutan Fyah studied architecture and played professional football before launching into a music career in 1999. Cutting early records for Buju Banton’s Gargamel label, he would go on to collab with such culturally inclined artists as Lucinano and Turbulence. On his latest release, produced by Tim Dub, Fyah goes beyond the usual ganja tune cliches, giving a botanical lesson on the definition of “trichomes” and how these small glandular hairs growing from the epidermis of herb buds relate to the cultivation of the cannabis plant. Video After The Jump…
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WATCH THIS: Kabaka Pyramid “Kabaka vs. Pyramid” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Kabaka Pyramid "Kabaka vs. Pyramid" Official Music Video

Accurate Lyricist Drops Battle-Rap-Themed Video

Kabaka Pyramid continues the trend of Rastafarian artists rapping over boom bap hip-hop beats. In this video, aptly titled “Kabaka vs. Pyramid,” the artist pays homage to battle rap and stages a rap battle with himself. Hip hop has a long history of alter-egos, from Tupac/Makavelli to Eminem/Slim Shady, and even T.I. vs. T.I.P. Will the Bebble Rock spitter continue the trend in dancehall? Rockin’ over Biggie’s “Gimme The Loot” riddim, one persona keeps it patois while the other is twangin’ like a youth who spent time in Miami as he was coming up. Watch the video and find out who wins. Video After The Jump…
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WATCH THIS: Anthony Cruz “Where Would I Be” Official Music Video

WATCH THIS: Anthony Cruz "Where Would I Be" Official Music Video

Giving Thanks For Guidance and Protection

Anthony Cruz is one of those under-the-radar reggae singers whose understated excellence deserves more praise than it receives. We first noticed him when he was rolling with the 5th Element crew alongside Richie Spice and Chuck Fender (aka “The Poor People Defender). Although he can finesse a lover’s rock tune more sweetly than most, Cruz has always been at his best singing reality tunes. “Place Too Bloody” his combination with Buju Banton, and the Beres Hammond produced “Dem Block Di Road” on Harmony House’s “Feel Good” riddim are two outstanding examples. Yesterday Cruz released a new video on his official website revealing that his clean-cut look has been replaced with a ragga-ragga Rastafari image. In the song, produced by the legendary Bobby Digital, Cruz gives thanks for live, health, and strength—acknowledging that even when he feels he’s in “Cruz control” there is a higher power calling the shots. Dropping so soon after Jamaica’s close call with Hurricane Matthew, the message is as timely as the song is strong.  Audio After The Jump… Read more »

“Nothing Can Harm Me” Remembering Countryman

"Nothing Can Harm Me" Remembering Countryman

A Man Who Represented Rastafari In Real Life

After battling cancer for years, the death of Edwin “Countryman” Lothan hit his friends and fans very hard. Though he passed away September 18th, obituaries are just starting to appear in the international press for this simple Rasta fisherman who appeared in a feature story in Rolling Stone magazine in 1973, a living symbol of Rastafari at a time when few Americans had even heard of reggae music. Nine years later he starred in the film Countryman, produced by Island Records founder Chris Blackwell. He lived a simple life according to strict principles of Rastafari. All the obituaries mention these facts, but this is what I remember, the Countryman I knew. Essay After The Jump… Read more »

“LAVAAA!!!” The Irie Flame of I-Wayne

"LAVAAA!!!" The Irie Flame of I-Wayne

Lava Splash! Fire Dash! Everything Burn To Ash

Sunday September 4th marked Irie Jam’s 23rd Anniversary concert spotlighting Sizzla Kalonji’s return-to-New-York performance after eight long years of absence. The supporting superstar line-up to the sizzling stage show included an artist who personifies lines from Kalonji’s “King in the Jungle.”  Seated up so high, yet so humble, I-Wayne brought his celestial presence and the hard/soft balance of his cool and deadly style to the Irie Jam Radio massive in the leafy green confines of Roy Wilkins Park. Mainstream airwaves aren’t the lane for I-Wayne. As the Prophet Capleton once put it, he is on a mission, not in a competition. To see him truly manifest is to catch him live in the flesh. After a seething set that made knowledge born that his musical ministry is service to the people—not about bulleting Billboard or gaining Grammys—we linked up with the Loyal Soliders Promotion crew backstage. I-Wayne broke it down with Boomshots as to what the Irie Jam performance meant to him, burning a righteous fire, and shedding light on the livity of a lava lyricist. Video After The Jump… Read more »

Reasoning with Capleton: “Music Is A Mission”

Reasoning with Capleton: "Music Is A Mission"

Throwback Q&A with The Prophet • New York City 2000 A.D.

I had been listening to Capleton for years before I got the chance to interview him at Def Jam Records offices on Varick Street in Manhattan. He sat smoking beedies and a spliff with his manager Stuart Brown a.k.a. African Star in the record label conference room. Capleton’s first album for Def Jam, Prophecy, consisted of pretty much straight hardcore tracks from Jamaica, although the new one, I Testament, was a bit more “smooved out” shall we say, showing more influence from label A&Rs. But King Shango’s mental state was the same irresistible force it has ever been. He was named after a well-known local barrister, the lawyer Capleton, and the DJ’s reasoning is always forceful, like a prosecutor giving the closing argument on the biggest case of his life. Interview After The Jump… Read more »