Brooklyn Producer Takashi Suehiro Debuts New riddim with Veteran Reggae Artist Yami Bolo

When two different worlds collide, sometimes you realize that the differences are quite subtle and may never matter at all. When this happens in music, it is a magical fusion. The artist and producer can unite in a studio and create an ecletic sound. In 2016,  Brooklyn producer, Takashi Suehiro, who mostly works with undergound local artists, is seeing an exponential rise in the number of international artists interested in his riddims. His latest riddim, the Slay riddim, caught the attention of Isasha and Yami Bolo. Yami Bolo flew to New York to lay down a track on this riddim, and the result was a lover’s rock tune, “Tell Me You Love Me, ” with a unique and invigorating sound. Audio & Interview After The Jump

 

Interview with Takashi Suehiro

Charlene: Yami Bolo voice was amazing over the Slay riddim, pure perfection! How did you come up with the riddim?

Takashi: I am a musician. I play every instrument in a riddim and then I produce the riddim based on the live instrumentation so it creates a different sound. Inna Original style! It was an honor to work the living legend, Yami Bolo on the “Slay” riddim. He said I gave him a new style.

Charlene: Just curious how did you link up with this veteran in reggae?

Takashi: Well Khari Kill and Jah Bami are my friends and I have worked with them on songs and they told Yami Bolo about me and then he called me. He came through to Takashi Studios on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn and I showcased the Slay riddim. He really liked it and we produced the song ” Tell Me You Love Me” together. Isasha also had a first look at the Slay riddim so big artists are really loving this riddim.

Charlene: So what do you plan to do next with this riddim being in high demand?

Takashi: I plan to do a compilation album for the Slay riddim featuring many artists. I have worked on many other riddims, but people do not know it is my riddim. So now trying to do things differently in terms of promotion, so people can know my works.

Charlene: So much hard work over the years. Keep up the excellence, Takashi. How can people link with you if they want to jump on the Slay riddim?

Takashi: They can e-mail me at suehiro.takashi@gmail.com for business inquiries and for general information they can link me on facebook Takashi Suehiro

Charlene: Thank you for sharing with Boomshots and we will be looking out for your compilation album.

Takashi: Give tanks, I appreciate you featuring my riddim, and much respect to my brother Yami Bolo

Studio Session at Takashi Studios: Right to Left– Takashi Suehiro, Shyne J Umemoto, Yami Bolo and JD Ranking

shyne                                                     Interview with Yami Bolo

Charlene: Three decades of music. Wow, how did it happen?

Yami Bolo: Yes I, give tanks. “Who Made The Mountain?/ Jah Made Them All” was my first recording. I grew in the Ghetto of Kingston and I use to sing and this guy from England heard me singing and invited me to sing for Sugar Minott of Youthman Promotions. I sang Michael Jackson, “Lady In My Life.” Sugar Minott told me I sounded good but I needed more work so to stick around his soundsystem and the rest is history, Jah Know.

Charlene: I love listening to that first recording, one of my favorites. So did you know Tenor Saw, who was discovered by Sugar Minott too?

Yami Bolo: Know him (laugh). Its me who taught him to ride motor bike. That was my brother, deep God fearing yout from the Ghetto. I used to go to his mother house, Mrs. Cherry. Lots of studio time together at Youthman Promotions. We talked a lot about our dreams and plans for the future.

Charlene: I wrote an article on him and noted his untimely death. The whole thing gave me chills because they still don’t know what happened to him in Texas.

Yami Bolo: You know I tried not to cry, I put the tears in my music. I pray for Mrs. Cherry, for her to get justice, in this crime against humanity.

Charlene: Sorry for that loss of your good friend. His music lives on, so spiritual and deep.

Yami Bolo: And his music was a real representation of who he was.

Charlene: I could feel that music so much, the spirituality of it. On a lighter note, let’s talk about all the love you have wrapped in this new tune.

Yami Bolo: Yes the experience of life, love and melodies is in “Tell Me You Love Me”

                I wanna wait until its dark/ to make your true love spark/With every beating of my heart / true love has now just start

Charlene: I loved the way your voice sounded over the Slay riddim, how did you make the connection with Takashi?

Yami Bolo: I like to work on real different projects, like when I worked with artist and producer Kazafumi Mizayawa (Miya) on the Miya-Yami Project. We met while I was performing for Japan Splash and the promotor made the connection. We then recorded in Jamaica and made two videos in Japan. I wanted to create a project with a raw sound and I was touring with Jah Bami and Sons of Dub and Addis Pablo in England. Thats how I heard about Takashi and I came to Brooklyn to link with him.

Charlene: What did you like about the Slay riddim when you heard it?

Yami Bolo: It was just a different sound and the vibes were good right away. We worked together several times and he is my brother, like family.

Charlene: Nice for you as a veteran artist to give this Brooklyn producer a chance.

Yami Bolo: He really deserves it, he is a really great producer.

Charlene: Can fans expect a visual to “Tell Me You Love Me” soon?

Yami Bolo: Yes, we are working on it and I also have a song coming out with Jah Cure, Shabba Ranks and Junior Reid called “Street Kings”

Charlene: You are not playing in 2016, serious works, King

Yami Bolo: A lot of people think I am a veteran artist, but I am not done, as long as I have the voice and energy I am going to do this music.

Charlene: You seet. Much, much respect Yami Bolo! Thank you for sharing with Boomshots Magazine

Yami Bolo: Thank you, blessings Empress.

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