Reggae Music Legend in the Mecca of Music and Culture, Brooklyn

The sun was shinning bright as I walked along New York Avenue, in Brooklyn, New York. I was greeted by a Rastafarian King, left hand over the heart,  wearing a sunny yellow hat with a  polo to match. I tipped my black shades to take a closer look at the face of the person greeting me and it was the living legend himself, Phillip Fraser!  He was shocked that I recognized who he was. I said “Great music is great music!” Known for albums  like “Come Ethiopians” (1974, Freedom Sound Label), “Back to Africa” (1978, Different Records, original recording with Busta Riley, Winston Riley’s brother) featuring Earth and Stone, “Blood of the Saint” (1983), “Never Let Go” (1991, Razor Sound Records), “Phillip Fraser: Sharp Like Razor” (1993, Razor Sound Records),  “More Phillip Fraser” (2015, Razor Sound Records) and a plethora of complication albums and productions. If you appreciate roots reggae and lovers rock, you have to know this artists’ anthology of music. Interview After The Jump…

I grew up in an area named Greenwich, in Kingston Territory. Earl Chinna Smith, Earl Zero, Betram Brown, Sammy Dread, Micheal Prophet, Prince Allah… these were my friends. Bunny Lee was  the big producer and my mentor. Through Bunny, I met Slim Smith, who was my idol and favorite singer.  Slim Smith had a special falsetto voice and I wanted to have a unique voice like him. I covered his song “Never Let Go” (1981, Roots Tradition Label) in my first recording and people thought it was my original tune and then I received more requests to record. I recorded with Earl Chinna Smith, Bobby Digital, King Jammys to name a few. My career took flight from there. Now it’s 45 years later. ”    —Phillip Fraser

On Flashback Friday, Boomshots Magazine salutes this veteran from Kingston, Jamaica. Let’s hone into his 1981 masterpiece, “God of My Righteousness.” The  vocal sincerity and enunciation in this song, inspired by Psalms 4, 17 and 143, is truly amazing. The live instrumental recording, adds to the fine sound quality:

” Please Consider Me, Good Lawwwd,

       Please Consider Me….”

How pertinent is this song in these last days and perilous times?  (2 Timothy 3)

Video and Interivew – Charlene Wiggins; Video Editing – Rob Kenner

iTunes, Phillip Fraser

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